Shrimping for Recreation

Southeast
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March 2020
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By
Carol
Bareuther

Visitors are welcome to catch their own crustaceans in Lowcountry waters by shrimping. The two requirements are a fishing license and free SIP (Saltwater Information Program) permit. You also must follow the same season as commercial shrimpers, typically from mid-June through mid-January.

401 West Restaurant Sweet Heat Shrimp | Shrimping | Marinalife
401 West Restaurant Sweet Heat Shrimp

Shrimp occur throughout Georgia's estuaries and coastal environments, so visitors have lots of options to try their luck, says Bryan Fluech, associate marine extension director for the Marine Extension and Georgia Sea Grant station in Brunswick, GA.

401 West Restaurant Shrimp & Grits | Shrimping | Marinalife
401 West Restaurant Shrimp & Grits

Recreational shrimping commonly occurs off docks and piers, people's boats, and from the shoreline, both oceanfront and estuarine. Late summer and fall are popular times for shrimping off our beaches as this is when many of our white shrimp are moving out of the sounds into the ocean. Saint Simons, Jekyll and Tybee are popular locations, because you can drive to them and they have multiple access locations along the beaches, inlets and sounds.

Cast nets and seine nets are the two most common types of gear used for recreational shrimping. However, in addition to recreational harvest limits, there are also rules about mesh sizes and net sizes for this gear. Visitors should review the state's regulations before going shrimping to avoid fines.

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