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The Blessed Isles: More than Just a Stop Over

SAILING ACROSS AN OCEAN IS OFTEN SEEN AS A MARINER's BIGGEST ACHIEVEMENT. With 4,000 miles between America and Europe, the distance across the Atlantic means a four-week transit across a temperamental ocean. For this reason, a small collection of mid-Atlantic islands earned the name, The Blessed Isles. Officially called Macaronesia, these four island groups the Azores, Madeira, Canaries and Cape Verde have played a central role in trans-Atlantic trade since boats first started long-distance voyages.[caption id="attachment_324683" align="alignleft" width="300"]

winship family - cruising - marinalife

Kia Koropp and John Daubeny with their children, Braca and Ayla in Los Lobos | John McCuen[/caption]Located west of Portugal, Spain and the north-African coast in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean, they continue to offer a mid-passage respite for modern-day mariners keen for a short break in route between the two continents.The four island groups are often considered relatively similar. All are volcanic in origin with several of the islands still active (as illustrated by the recent eruption of Cumbre Vieja in Las Palmas, Canaries in September 2021).Isolation from the mainland allowed species of animal and fauna to flourish, and their exposure to strong trade winds means a harsh environment during the northern winter.During my family's voyage here, we wanted to cut our trans-Atlantic passage by adding a mid-Atlantic stop, so we used the Canaries as a break point. Our plan: A week transit from Europe to the Canaries and then a three-week sail to the Caribbean.The Canaries is an autonomous region of Spain that consists of 13 islands. Given the geographic similarity to the Macaronesia islands, I was expecting an extension of Madeira and the Azores, but I couldn't have been more misinformed. Instead, we saw vast diversity within an island group. Each of the 13 islands has its own unique environment with a fascinating heritage that is evident today. To see one island is certainly not to have seen the others.

Tenerife Cave Dwellings

The original settlers of the Canaries were the Guanches who arrived from Africa in the 1st or 2nd century. They settled in caves across the islands, concentrated in Tenerife. What fascinated me about this history is that people still live in these cave dwellings today. Excursions throughout the countryside revealed numerous dwellings spread across the island with drying laundry splayed out on lines, dogs lounging outside cave entrances, chairs perched aside a rock wall and chickens living in their coops all scattered evidence of human habitation.We found isolated valleys where large communities were dispersed across a mountainside with small footpaths winding their way up the slope. I was intrigued by this current cave culture, still alive and vibrant. I've travelled to many countries where old cave dwellings are protected as UNESCO Heritage Sites, but this was the first time I'd seen established villages in remote caves. I drove aimlessly throughout the island, trying to find as many cave dwellings as I could discover a surprisingly easy feat given the number of them spread out throughout the Canaries.

Lanzarote Volcanic Vineyards

[caption id="attachment_324686" align="alignright" width="300"]

Cave settlements - cruising - marinalife

Cave settlements dot the hillsides across the Canaries. | Kia Koropp[/caption]Both the Azores and Canaries have developed a unique form of viticulture in a very inhospitable region. It's hard to imagine that someone can grow anything but the most rugged crop in the rocky, volcanic soil. Grape vines were the last thing I expected to crisscross the region. However, ingenious vintners have done just that they created an environment where grapes not only grow, but thrive.This form of deep-root horticulture called arenado is unique to Lanzarote. Small semi-circular walls called zoco are made from black lava stones that protect a single vine, providing a barrier against strong trade winds. It's a labor-intensive form of cultivation as each crater holds one vine, making hand-picked grapes the only option for harvesting. I did not anticipate a wine-tasting on our mid-Atlantic stop, but it was delicious and historically fascinating.

Lava Tubes & Subterranean Tunnels

Lava tubes and deep volcanic caverns riddle the Canary Islands. Several islands, such as Gran Canaria and Tenerife, have extensive pyroclastic fields and some display dramatic volcanic cones with impressive craters, such as Teide on Tenerife and Cumbre Vieja on La Palma.Given the range of erosional stages of the volcanic islands, each one offers a unique perspective. This means we could hike to the top of a volcanic rim that is covered in deep foliage (Gran Canaria), walk through volcanic moonscapes (Los Lobos), wander deep inside massive caverns (Lanzarote) and follow lava tubes deep inside (Tenerife).The different stages of each island display both the devastation and the beauty that volcanoes bring. As one explodes, another holds a breathtaking amphitheater and a species of blind crab that is indigenous to the island. While locals continue to deal with the aftermath of Cumbre Vieja's violent explosion on La Palma, Cueva de los Verdes, Lanzarote holds concerts for an audience of 500 in its expansive cavern and provides sanctuary to a species of blind albino cave crabs in its deep-turquoise underground freshwater lagoon.

Underwater Sculpture Garden

Equally unique to the Canaries is Europe's first underwater sculpture garden, a collection of 12 installations laid down by sculptor Jason deCaires Taylor to raise social and environmental awareness. Museo Atlántico was made public in 2017 and holds 300 life-sized human figures performing everyday tasks: a couple holding hands, a man sitting on a swing, fishermen in their boats, someone taking a selfie. Four years on and the sculptures are starting to create a decent false reef. The effect is impressive ... and rather eerie. My dive at the site remains an unforgettable experience that should not be missed on a trip through Lanzarote.[caption id="attachment_324684" align="alignleft" width="225"]

Museo Atlántico - cruising - marinalife

Examples of individual exhibits in the Museo Atlántico underwater sculpture park, Lanzarote | Kia Koropp[/caption]Many sailors use the largest of the Canary Islands, Las Palmas in Gran Canaria, solely for provisioning and boat preparation before a trans-Atlantic passage. However, if you bypass the islands that surround the main island you'd miss out on interesting and diverse islands that should be a highlight destination in the Eastern Atlantic. The ones we visited on our sail through the island group were a continuous series of unfolding surprises.The villages hold their own quaint small-town European character, and each island offers an experience drastically different than its neighbor. From the bustle of Gran Canaries largest city, Las Palmas, to the silent cave dwellers of its outer communities; from the enormous sand dunes of Fuertaventura's ParqueNatural de las Dunas to the barren volcanic cone of Los Lobos to the lush laurel forest of Los Tilos de Moya in Gran Canaria; from sea to inland lake to crater rim to underground tunnels; from camel back to mountaintop to mid-city cafes. The Canaries' special diversity makes a hop-through in route from America to Europe a must-see adventure.

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Our Adventures between the Great Lakes from Detroit to Port Huron

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Cruising Cartagena: A Worthy Destination
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Route planning can sometimes be more about what you choose to miss rather than what you include. Time in country can be surprisingly short for many cruisers, as seasonal weather requires you to plot a destination and move toward it on a relatively strict timeframe. Often you leave little room for detours and deviations. If a country isn’t on your track, it is left in your wake forever. 

The problem is, unplanned destinations often crop up and fitting them in can become a priority.  Colombia was never a name on our cruising destinations list until we arrived in the Southern Caribbean, but the closer we got to South America the more frequently the name Cartagena cropped up. At the time our focus was on transiting the Panama Canal and cruising the remote Pacific Islands, so detouring to a big city didn’t appeal. However, we were going from low-key islands in the Atlantic to low-key islands in the Pacific, so an injection of high-speed would be a nice change of pace. With a large, sheltered bay, busy metropolitan city, UNESCO World Heritage Site and the vivacious Latin culture, Colombia was our unexpected add-on. 

As the date for our transit to Colombia neared, rumors started to spread concern. We heard reports of strong winds, poor anchorages and crime off the north coast of Colombia, as reasons to avoid the country. The winds that funnel around the coast create a wind acceleration zone, resulting in high winds and steep seas. Would we be driving our boat Aeta into a chaotic washing machine? Colombia has a history of violent crime. Would we lose everything not padlocked to the deck or hidden on our bodies? Everyone spoke of rough anchorages and the need to stay in marinas. Could our budget survive? 

The more we heard of Colombia, however, the more the sense of adventure outweighed calls for caution. As sailors, how could we not be drawn to a city steeped in piracy, conquest and gold? As travelers, how could we not fall under the spell of a vibrant city thriving behind old, fortified walls? Plus, we’d get a break from our lazy sun-drenched Caribbean beach days to drink “aquadentes” under the twinkling lights strung above Cartagena’s rooftop bars and dance until dawn in the city’s famous salsa clubs. We re-drew the travel plan for the season and decided to sail for Cartagena. 

The Old Amid the New

Cartagena’s dramatic high-rise skyline rose up on the horizon as we closed our two-day passage from Bonaire to Colombia, giving our first indication of the different pace that lay ahead of us. As we entered through the eastern entrance to Bocagrande, our echo-sounder bounced from 10 to 3 meters, registering an underwater breakwater that was built in the mid-1700s to close off the northern entrance to the bay and force access to Cartegena by sea past the heavily fortified southern entrance. 

Old military forts that once protected the Spanish from foreign invaders now stood idle, welcoming inbound traffic from all over the world. Today, Cartagena is Colombia’s main container port and processes around 1,600 vessels each year, including container ships, cruise ships, bulk carriers and the odd cruising yacht. The cannons that point seaward are no longer a threat to foreign interest. [Image 5]

Sailing past these 500-year-old fortifications is a reminder that much of Cartagena’s past is deeply woven into its present. Old forts stand beside modern skyscrapers that line the shoreline of Playa de Bocagrande, Cartagena’s version of Miami Beach. Empty turrets stand next to busy modern housing complexes and sections of fortress break way to streets and pedestrian walkways. La Ciudad Amurallada, Cartagena’s historic walled city, is the most well-preserved and complete fortification in South America. As in the past, horse and cart roll down old cobblestone streets; however, they are now interrupted by lengthy traffic jams. 

Perfectly preserved colonial architecture has been repurposed into swanky cafés, upmarket restaurants, local residences and boutique shops. The 11 kilometers of old city wall are a unique feature, as you can circumnavigate the city by walking on top of them. The old, exposed brick covered in beautifully painted graffiti and covered in brightly blooming jacaranda is a perfect example of how the past has been woven into the present, creating one of the most beautiful cities in the world. [Image 6a-e] 

We enjoyed every minute of our time in Cartagena. We wandered through San Felipe de Barajas Castle and learned about the constant pirate assaults and colonial invasions, then strolled through the convent and chapel of La Candelaria de la Popa, a beautiful church that sits atop the city’s highest hilltop, Mount Popa. We walked throughout the old walled city a dozen times, seeing popular landmarks from statues of Simón Bolivar and India Catalina that stand in central plazas to gold museums, theater houses, slave quarters and bull rings held within beautiful colonial buildings. We found a dozen or so Spanish colonial-style churches and cathedrals spread throughout the city. 

When we were done sightseeing, we soaked up the colorful Colombian environment. We relaxed in street side cafés, listened to buskers strumming local tunes, window-shopped outside upmarket designer boutiques, ate scrumptious local chow in hole-in-the-wall restaurants and gazed at the provocative murals and graffiti that are displayed throughout the city. 

While ambling through backstreets and staring at magnificent street art, I remembered the list of reasons not to come to Cartagena, and crime topped the list. When everything around me left me buzzing with delight, I wondered what the negative comments were about. [Image 7a-e]

Little Reason for Concern

After gaining first-hand experience, we saw that many of the streets considered too dangerous 20 years ago are now popular hangout spots filled with funky cafes and swanky bars, trendy artisan shops and local art galleries. Rough turned bohemian, and the historically volatile neighborhoods had transformed into a hip, artistic quarter that drew international visitors by the thousands. While I was wary of pickpockets, I had no cause for concern regarding serious crime. [Image 8a-b]

Poor anchorages and restrictions to marinas were also mentioned, but we stayed just outside the Club Nautico de Cartagena marina with our anchor buried deep in the mud. The only rough movement we experienced was created by daily tour boats rushing past us and stirring up significant chop. If you do Cartagena right as a busy tourist, daytime discomfort is irrelevant. By the time you return to your slip, tour boats are tucked in their berths and the peaceful quiet of a flat, calm anchorage surrounded by a city full of sparkling lights presents a view no fancy hotel could match. [Image 9a-b]

Regarding caution with strong winds, the place of greatest intensity is the water between Punta Gallinas and Cabo Augusta. Approach the area with a good forecast, but it requires nothing more than standard good seamanship. The winds can be strong, and the swell can be large, but with a proper forecast you need not avoid the north coast of Colombia. We enjoyed remote, peaceful bays of the Tayrona National Park and the bustle of our anchorage in Cartagena’s busy port, but planned our movement between them with a quick weather check. With time and prudence, entry into the country doesn’t warrant precautions out of the norm. [Image 10]

After experiencing Colombia firsthand, we start a new rumor — Cartagena is a fantastic cruising destination. The winds are manageable, safe anchorages are plentiful and serious crime is a carryover from a bygone era. Take your time, check your weather, trust your anchor and go have big city fun. I came to Cartagena uncertain about what lay ahead, but in a matter of days I’d fallen for its charm. I could stay in the area for weeks, months, even years. Given a sturdy A/C unit, I could stay indefinitely. 

The people are friendly, the topography varied, the cruising options abundant. The city is a living history, blending the old and the new, the past and the present. It is radiant, vibrant and absorbing. 

Adding Colombia to our itinerary was a fantastic diversion, and if it lays as a detour from your route, do yourself a favor: rewrite the plan. Make sure you don’t look back and see it left behind in your wake. A dog-leg isn’t a detour when it holds all that Cartagena offers. It is the destination. [Image 11a-c]

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Our Adventures between the Great Lakes from Detroit to Port Huron
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My husband Tim and I spent 2021 traveling 8,000 miles around the Great Loop. Like many, we wanted to cruise in Canada, but we didn’t get the green light for entry in time. We were initially bummed, but our mood quickly shifted as we discovered some of our favorite stops on the stretch that kept us in U.S. waters, including our journey between Lake Erie and Lake Huron.

Starting Point: Detroit, MI

It’s not uncommon to find bumper stickers and t-shirts throughout the city with the slogan, “Say Nice Things About Detroit.” We found it was pretty easy to do. In fact, Detroit was so nice that we extended our stay in port by choice, because we didn’t want to miss out on all the Motor City has to offer.

The protected 52-slip William G. Milliken State Park and Harbor is the city’s most centrally located marina where it’s easy to take advantage of MoGo (Detroit’s bike-share), scooters and Uber to zip around the city.

Detroit’s dining options are mesmerizing and abundant.  Grab a slice of Detroit-style pizza at Buddy’s Pizza. For great Greek food, head to family-owned Pegasus Taverna, order the saganaki and prepare to yell “Opa!” with your server. Enjoy breakfast at Avalon International Breads for homemade bread and a fresh warm sticky bun. Be sure to sample hotdogs from Lafayette Coney Island and American Coney Island restaurants. They’ve been neighbors since the 1930s, and it is contested which restaurant has the best dog, so I recommend trying one from both to pick your team.

Stretch your legs biking or walking along Detroit’s Riverwalk, named the best riverwalk in the country.  It runs along the Detroit River and weaves around green parks, volleyball courts, wetlands and an amphitheater.

If you visit Detroit on a weekend, take the Dequindre Cut, a two-mile greenway lined with art from the marina to Eastern Market. In operation since 1891, the market spans six blocks with vendors from all over the state selling fresh food and produce on Saturdays and locally made goods on Sundays. The wares were so delicious that it made us wish we had more room in our galley (and more meals in the day).

Detroit’s downtown is bustling in the summer. Test your skills on rollerblades at the summer-only outdoor roller rink at Monroe Street Midway or grab a drink and put your toes in the sand at the beach at Campus Martius Park. And if you’re lucky to be in town during a home game, head over to Comerica Park stadium to catch a Tigers game.

To learn how Detroit became the “Motor City.” A 20-minute drive about 4 miles from the marina brings you to Ford’s headquarters where you can take a tour of the Ford Rouge Factory and the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant, where Henry Ford built the Model T. Detroit’s rich past is not just limited to cars. Spend an afternoon getting to know the city’s history of innovation and ingenuity at the Detroit Historical Museum. 

Just steps from the marina, check out Michigan’s Department of Natural Resources' impressive Outdoor Adventure Center, to help you take advantage of Michigan's great outdoors and get pumped up for future cruising through the region’s waterways.

Stop 1: Belle Isle

Estimated Mileage: 2 NM

Belle Isle is the largest city-owned island park in America, located on the Detroit River between the United States and Canada. The island’s only marina is the Detroit Yacht Club, which has a limited number of transient slips for reciprocal members, so it’s best to explore while keeping your boat at Milliken Marina. 

Roughly 1,000 acres, Belle Isle is home to an aquarium, maritime museum, botanical garden, beach, picnic areas and playgrounds that provide a plethora of options to explore. You won’t find great spots to grab a bite to eat, so we recommend stopping at Atwater Brewery on the way back to the marina.

Stop 2: Harrison Township, Lake St. Clair

Estimated Mileage: 24 NM

Often referred to as the Great Lake’s smaller cousin, Lake St. Clair is large enough to easily keep your distance from freighters yet small enough to explore in a day.

By boat, you can visit several of the lake’s swimming spots in Anchor and Bouvier Bays (or “Munchies” Bay as the locals say), popular for their clear water and hard bottoms. After an afternoon of swimming, cruise through the Clinton River and tie up at one of several restaurants catering to a lively boater scene for a drink and meal. Crews Inn is one of our favorites for their fun atmosphere and great food.

Lake St. Clair Metropark Marina is a popular spot for transients. The marina is located in the park, so after docking, enjoy the expansive park’s beaches, trails, picnic areas and swimming pool.

Stop 3: Port Huron, MI

Estimated Mileage: 44 NM

Port Huron is home to the start of one of the longest fresh-water races in the world called the Port Huron to Mackinac Sailing Race, and the port is a charming and boater-friendly destination.

Ideal for its central location and friendly members, Port Huron Yacht Club is a great place for tying up, sipping a drink at the clubhouse and avoiding the drawbridges on the Black River. Another popular spot is about a mile farther down the river at the 95-slip River Street Marina.

Port Huron is home to the Island Loop Route National Water Trail, a 10-mile loop through the Black River, Lake Huron and St. Clair River. Your dinghy is a must through the Black River and for exploring the town and clear waters by boat.

Walk a mile along the Blue Water River Walk that runs along the St. Clair River. Be sure to leave enough time to watch the freighters go by and delve into the area’s history that is shared along the route. Continue a couple of miles farther to Lighthouse Park, where you can enjoy an afternoon at the beach and swim in Lake Huron’s crystal clear water.

During a stroll downtown, check out the Knowlton’s Ice Museum of North America to discover the history of local ice harvesting that took place along the Great Lakes.

When you’ve done enough activities to work up an appetite, Casey’s is the place for delicious breadsticks and pizza. For a more upscale option, you can’t go wrong with anything on the menu at The Vintage Tavern. Maria’s Downtown Café offers a hearty breakfast, and Raven Café or Exquisite Corpse Coffee House are great options for a cup of coffee.

Kate Carney is a writer and Great Gold Looper who traveled 8,000 miles on Sweet Day, a 31-foot Camano trawler. Learn more about her and her husband’s adventures on lifeonsweetday.com

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Women Take to the Water
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It’s 5:30 p.m. on a Friday. Do you know where your wife, mother, daughter or sister is? She might be at the Chicago Yacht Club, launching off in a learn-to-sail lesson in the summer series that’s part of the Women on the Water Program.  Or, if she’s in the Florida Keys, you could find her relaxing ashore after a day casting about in a Ladies, Let’s Go Fishing! tournament. Or maybe she’s cruising the Intracoastal Waterway in North Myrtle Beach on a pontoon boat with friends, all members of Freedom Boat Club’s Sisters group. 

Nationwide nowadays, many groups and clubs are oriented specifically toward female boaters. Some are exclusively for women, others are clubs within co-ed clubs, and still others are part of century-old all-inclusive organizations that now offer opportunities for the ladies.

“A boater is a boater; it’s anyone who loves being on the water. Still, for many years and often today, boating is viewed as a man’s sport. That’s changing as more opportunities become available for women to get out on the water,” says Mary Paige Abbott, the past Chief Commander of the U.S. Power Squadrons, rebranded as America’s Boating Club with 30,000 members — 30% of them women. The century-plus-old organization opened its membership to females in 1982.

Women making waves in boating isn’t new. New York-born Hélène de Pourtalès was the first female to win a medal sailing in the 1900 Olympics. Helen Lerner, who with her husband Michael and friend Ernest Hemingway founded the Bahamas Marlin & Tuna Club in 1936, recorded a women’s first record catch of a swordfish off Nova Scotia. In 1977, Betty Cook landed a first-place finish in the powerboat world championships held in Key West. These examples are extraordinary but only exceptions to the rule that boating is a male-dominated sport. 

Today, the tide is turning. Take sports fishing for example. About 36% of Americans who went fishing last year were women, an all-time participation high, according to the 2021 Special Report on Fishing by the Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to increasing involvement in recreational angling and boating.

WHY WOMEN?

Why not? That’s what led Betty Bauman to start Ladies, Let’s Go Fishing! in 1997. Since then, this organization of which Bauman is founder and chief executive officer, hosts weekend seminar series dubbed the No-Yelling School of Fishing, as well as tournaments throughout Florida and abroad. To date, Bauman has empowered more than 9,000 women to sportfish.  

“I attended ICAST (International Convention of Allied Sportfishing Trades, the world’s largest sportfishing trade show) when I had a public relations agency. The American Sportfishing Association’s director asked in a speech why weren’t more women in fishing? After all, as he pointed out, the sport wasn’t reaching some 50% of the potential market. I thought to myself, women don’t want to feel uncomfortable or get yelled out. So, I came up with a way to teach women the basics. How to tie knots, how rods and reels work, and how to make value assessments when fishing, not just following what their husbands yell at them to do or going down in the galley to make sandwiches,” says Bauman.

Women learn differently from men, and that’s the benefit of learning boating skills with and from other women. Just ask Debbie Huntsman, the past president of the National Women’s Sailing Association (NWSA).

“My husband and I were taking a learn to sail class years ago. I saw another boat in the distance and asked the instructor, who was a man, what I needed to do to be sure we didn’t have a collision. He answered that it was just like going down the aisle at the supermarket with a shopping cart; you just know not to hit another cart. That didn’t do it for me,” Huntsman tells. 

The 1990-founded NWSA is a group of national and international women sailors. It supports its members via everything from a library of instructional videos taught by women, for women, to its annual conference, which features hands-on workshops and on-the-water coaching.

“I think women tend to be more meticulous in their learning. They want to know all the moving parts and why they move. They want to do it right and do it perfectly whether men are onboard or not. That’s what I see,” says Karen Berry, VP of operations at Freedom Boat Club (FBC) of the Grand Strand, in Myrtle Beach, SC.

FBC offers free boating training and safety education to all members, including those in the 2017-founded Freedom Boating Diva program, which Berry helped to launch. The group is now called the Freedom Boat Club Sisters group, and 40% of the clubs nationwide now have a Sister component. Members enjoy time on the water together, training activities, social events and boatloads of camaraderie.

CAMARADERIE & NETWORKING

More so than a one-and-done class, many women-centric boating groups and clubs feature ongoing and year-round events. A good example is Women on the Water, a club within a club run by the Chicago Yacht Club’s (CYC) Women’s Committee. The group’s Friday night learn-to-sail series in Sonar 23s only takes place during the summer. The rest of the year, the women (an eclectic group of boating-oriented 20-somethings to 70-plus-year-olds, singles and marrieds, professionals and retirees) meet monthly for educational programs, networking events and happy hours.

“We’ve done everything from a sunset powerboat tour to admire the architecture of the Chicago skyline to a cooking class taught by the club’s pastry chef. During the pandemic, we continued to meet virtually. We had the female president of the U.S. Naval War College speak. We met some of the crew of the Maiden Factor, which is sailing the world to promote women’s sailing, and we had one of our own speak — Maggie Shea, who raced in the 2020 Olympics. The fact that our events fill up and sell out almost immediately tells you there’s a need for this,” says Nancy Berberian, head of the CYC’s Women’s Committee.

Similarly, the nearly four-decade-old Women’s Sailing Association (WSA) at the Houston Yacht Club hosts a residential women’s sailing camp. The Windward Bound Camp, one of the first of its kind in the nation, organizes racing, educational and social events throughout the year.  

“Our sailing socials allow time on the water with other women in a non-competitive environment.  Yearly, we organize a ‘Sail to High.’ Yes, we wear lovely hats and gloves on the sailboat and dock at someone’s home for tea and trimmings,” says Jane Heron, WSA president.

More recently, Women on the Water of Long Island Sound (WOWLIS) was born, made up currently of more than 250 women from 14 yacht clubs in Connecticut and New York who love to sail, race, learn and socialize. 

“It started as a Supper Series, as a way to connect women across our venues,” says Cathleen Blood at WOWLIS. “Now, there is regularly held one-design racing on Ideal 18s, team and fleet racing events, chalk talks and clinics, summer regattas, frostbiting in the spring, and an annual winter meeting to plan for the year ahead. 

To participate in most of these events, you must be a member of one of the yacht clubs. In this way, it’s all about getting clubs to commit to training and get more women on the water. There’s a real advantage. Say there’s a race I want to sail. I’m never stuck for crew. I have a pool of over 200 women, whether I know them or not, I can ask. We’re all united by a shared love of sailing.”

A SAMPLING OF WAYS FOR WOMEN TO GET ON THE WATER

Chicago Yacht Club’s Women on the Water


Freedom Boat Club Sisters Program


Houston Yacht Club Women’s Sailing Association


Ladies Let's go Fishing


National Women’s Sailing Association


Women on the Water Long Island Sound

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Join a Father & Son Trip up the ICW
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Paul Kekalos - cruising - marinalife
Paul Kekalos and his father

"Might as well get going" said my dad as we stood on the dock, fresh out of things to prepare. I laughed to myself and replied, "Yeah, I guess we might as well." That conversation plays out in my head every time I set out on a boat a sign that all preparations are complete, and it's time to start the trip.

When my father asked me to help him deliver his Hatteras 40 from Charleston to Cape May via the ICW, I jumped at the chance to return to a special place in my life (I spent my summers in Cape May growing up) and spend bonding time with my dad. But I was not without apprehension. It would be my first trip on the ICW, his first in years, and the first on a new-to-him vessel. While I spend a lot of time on the water as a sailor, the twin diesels of the Hatteras were new to me.

As we were about to push off, dolphins showed up, easing the inevitable start-of-voyage jitters that accompany any trip. As we turned into Charleston Harbor and pointed toward the markers at the entrance to the first portion of the waterway heading north, our three dolphin friends escorted us through the channel markers. I took it as a good sign.

Starting Point: Charleston, SC

Charleston aerial - cruising - marinalife
Charleston Aerial | Pixaba

Estimated Mileage: 48 NM

We were warned that the first stretch of waterway was known for scattered shallow spots in the first few miles, but we found none. As waterfront homes of Sullivan's Island and Isle of Palms slowly peeled away to reveal the quiet wilderness of the Santee Coastal Reserve, I thought, "This is the ICW I imagined. Pristine, undeveloped and peaceful."

In the coming days, I would learn this was only part of the story. We pulled into Georgetown for the evening, and our first day was behind us. With that came the simple lesson: the only way to get over the nervousness of a trip is to start the journey. We slept well that night knowing we had done so.

Leg 1: Georgetown, SC to Southport, NC

Estimated Mileage: 72 NM

Leaving Georgetown and heading north up the Waccamaw River, the previous afternoon's tranquility continued. The soft light over the marshlands showed that ours was the only wake in sight, save for a few passing southbound boats. It was an easy way to start the day. And then ... Myrtle Beach ... on a Saturday... in June. The morning peacefulness gave way to a bustling stretch of waterway filled with all sorts of people enjoying the day center consoles, water skiers, kayakers, stand-up paddlers, floating tiki bars. Mile after mile of developed waterfront checked our speed and changed our perspective.

Eventually, we cleared through the beautiful chaos of Myrtle Beach, crossed into North Carolina and preceded toward that night's destination, Southport, NC. This was our first time experiencing the wonderful ICW phenomenon of just pulling over to dock on the proverbial side of the road. We settled into the facing fuel dock at Southport Marina and marveled at how the ICW contains multitudes of experiences.

Leg 2: Southport to Beaufort, NC

Estimated Mileage: 83 NM

The weather was mostly settled with morning showers, and thunderstorms were predicted, but clear skies were forecasted for the afternoon. Only on Day 3, we still were under the misguided illusion that the schedule was ours to keep. We wanted to cover some ground today, so we ducked out of the well-marked and relatively easy Masonboro Inlet for an outside run up the Atlantic to Beaufort, NC.

As we approached the Inlet, a local Sunday morning sailing race was underway. Half the fleet made it out of the inlet with us before we heard on the radio that the race committee was recalling the fleet due to approaching thunderstorms. We debated staying inside, but the weather quickly passed us, and we rode the gentle swell up to Beaufort Inlet. It was good to get in the miles by going outside the ICW, but we realized that was not the point of this trip. Leaving the ICW, we missed the variety that the waterway provides. We stayed inside for the rest of the trip to enjoy the view.

Leg 3: Beaufort to Belhaven, NC

Estimated Mileage: 50 NM

On a trip up the ICW, you discover it's anything but a highway. Leaving Beaufort, we noted how the waterway that we experienced thus far was a straight-line narrow cut with land close by on either side, often called the proverbial ditch. But the ICW also provides moments of wide-open beauty.Heading out of Beaufort and north up Adams Creek, the ICW gives way to the relative vastness of the Neuse River and Pamlico Sound. Navigation aids are more spaced out, and the wind waves have more room to gather up. We traveled a short stretch of the Sound, pulled into beautiful Belhaven Marina for the night and found the sleepy but utterly charming town was a great place to stop.

Leg 4: Belhaven to Coinjock, NC

Estimated Mileage: 58 NM

norfolk - cruising - marinalife
Norfolk's Busy Harbor | David Mark on Pixabay

Years of boating taught me that you seldom go five days without seeing weather that you'd rather not see. The past four days were pretty good weather-wise, so we were due for something else. Pulling out of Belhaven in light sprinkles and overcast skies, we entered the famed Alligator-Pungo River Canal. This is truly the ditch 21 miles of a virtual straight line that connects the Pungo and Alligator Rivers. It is narrow and long, and it helps to see where you are going.Fortunately, the weather cooperated, and we navigated the canal with ease. But just as we emerged into the wide-open Alligator River, heavy rains and stiff squalls closed in around us. I'm always nervous with weather, but my dad has a measured demeanor, so he put me at ease. We picked our way from buoy to buoy and emerged from the storm just as we passed through Alligator River Swing Bridge and started across Albemarle Sound for the evening's destination, Coinjock Marina & Restaurant. Here I learned the real lesson of the day order the prime rib!

Leg 5: Coinjock, NC to Norfolk, VA

Estimated Mileage: 34 NM

On every trip, you reach a point where you've gone over the hump. With five days of ICW behind us, we hit that point and could sense a change coming. We left Coinjock and picked our way across the long, shallow Currituck Sound into Virginia. As we wound our way through the meandering and pristine North Landing River Natural Area Preserve, both of us were excited to make Norfolk that evening and enter the Chesapeake for our final stretch. Several bridges are on this stretch of the ICW, but our timing was good, and we passed each without much wait.

Sliding through the Great Bridge Locks, we approached Norfolk. The city and its surrounding waterways' bustle was an absolute eye-opener after the past few days. It made the pace of Myrtle Beach seem bucolic. We slept well, knowing that we had come to mile zero on the ICW safely.

Leg 6: Chesapeake Bay: Norfolk, VA to Chesapeake & Delaware Canal

Estimated Mileage: 200 NM

If approaching Norfolk from the south is eye-opening, then traveling into the Chesapeake past the heart of the Naval docks is something else entirely. Mile after mile of grey steel. More naval ships that I'd ever seen in one place. Amazing! And just like that, you pass over Hampton Roads Tunnels, enter the Chesapeake and you're back to wide-open beauty.

Chesapeake & Delaware Canal - cruising - marinalife
Chesapeake & Delaware Canal | Lee Cannon on FLickr

Our time in the Bay was a bit rushed. I had to return to commitments at home, so we had to get in some miles now. The plan: proceed to Solomons for a night and then reach the C&D Canal. However, our optimistic timetable did not stop the Chesapeake from dealing us a few lessons along the way.

The Chesapeake does not care about your schedule. The weather was too crummy in Solomons to leave, so we wisely decided to stay an extra day. When we finally poked out of the Patuxent River, we realized the residual effects of the rain was still evident. The Bay delivered a wild ride, with wind, rain, short chop and limited visibility for a few hours. We pondered cutting our day short, but the weather lifted quickly. By the time we passed Annapolis, blue skies and flat seas surrounded us all the way to the C&D Canal. It was amazing how quickly and dramatically conditions on the Bay changed for the better.

Leg 7: Chesapeake City to Cape May, NJ

Estimated Mileage: 54 NM

After transiting the C&D Canal and entering the Delaware Bay for the final stretch, we were truly in home waters. But despite the time I spent on the Bay growing up, I had never navigated a boat down this tricky body of water. The Delaware is busy, with a narrow channel and many big working boats. We hugged the channel's edge as we made our way down the Bay leaving ample room for others.

As the bay widened out, we plotted our approach to Cape May Harbor. Our entry took us through the Cape May Canal and into the harbor, then on to the boats' summer berth, not far from where I had spent my childhood summers. With the trip virtually complete, we experienced the bittersweet feeling of nearing our destination. And the final stretch provided perhaps the best lesson of all: When you get the opportunity to bring a boat from one place to another with your old man, take it.

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Exploring Antigua by Land and Sea
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The beautiful island of Antigua was our destination for a short Caribbean getaway. Having visited many of the Caribbean islands, we were looking forward to exploring a new tropical locale and experiencing the wonderful local charm, culture, vistas and beaches. In fact, this Eastern Caribbean island boasts 365 beaches: one for every day of the year!

My travel companions for the week included my husband Jim, brother Anthony and sister-in-law, Amanda. Always a great group to travel with (our last adventure together led us to Greece, Italy and Croatia), so I knew a fun week filled with laughter was in store.

JenJimCatamaran - cruising with members - marinalife
Jim and Jen on the catamaran

As we peered out the airplane window on the approach to Antigua, we were instantly mesmerized by the pure turquoise blue waters and rolling green hills, and eager to get out on the water.

For my brother, this trip was not just an ordinary vacation. While it was my first time visiting the island, my brother has incredibly fond memories of trips to Antigua during the 1970s as a child, traveling with his grandparents, affectionately known to us as Meemah and Deedah. This week was an opportunity to share with us one of his favorite places in the world.

Anthony decided the best way to explore the island was by land and by sea. The first part of our trip was spent touring the island with a local driver and tour guide named Elvis, who is a native Antiguan living in one of the six parishes on the island with his wife and children. When Anthony spotted him on the beach wearing a Yankee cap, he knew this was the tour guide for us. Anthony and Elvis instantly bonded (even discovering they shared a birthday) and together planned our extraordinary excursion.

Our tour of the island started with a visit to St. Johns, the capital city of Antigua. While part of the town is geared toward the large cruise ships that help support the local economy, St. Johns retains its charm, filled with farmers markets, stalls and local restaurants. Amanda was immediately enchanted by one of the young local shopkeepers selling souvenirs with his mom.

The next stop was Betty's Hope, one of the earliest sugar plantations dating back to 1651. The sugar mills are beautifully preserved, and we learned about the large role these sugar plantations played in Antigua's history. While enjoying the scenery at Betty's Hope, Elvis surprised us with homemade sandwiches and rum punch. A delightful snack to recharge us for the next stop -- Devil's Bridge in the Indian Town National Park.

antigua - cruising with members - marinalife
Jim, Jen, Amanda, and Anthony

Devil's Bridge is a natural stone arch that was carved from the rocky coast by the constant pounding of waves. Locals say its name comes from surges of water that snatch away people who stray too close to the edge. The area around the arch features several natural blowholes that shoot up water and spray powered by waves from the Atlantic Ocean.

While Jim and I stayed far from the edge, Anthony ventured out close to the bridge for a unique photo opportunity. Later in the week, we would have a chance to see this incredible rock formation from the ocean.

We continued to travel up the rolling hills to Shirley Heights Lookout, first used during the Revolutionary War as a signal station and lookout for approaches to English Harbor. It is truly one of the most spectacular vistas I have ever seen.

Having reached the highest point in Antigua, it was time to get back to sea level. Our next stop centered around Nelson's Dockyard, a working Georgian-era naval dockyard, designated as a world heritage site in 2016. We delighted in exploring the dockyard and gazing over the beautiful yachts and sailboats moored at the Antigua Yacht Club Marina.

Driving through the lush dense greenery of the rainforest led us to an Antigua delicacy the black pineapple. On the side of the road just outside the rain forest, we stopped at a local fruit stand and chatted with the proprietor while she carved us a fresh black pineapple, known as the sweetest in the world. It definitely lived up to its reputation.

The final stop on our island tour was my favorite -- a chance to taste the island cuisine! Elvis called ahead of our arrival and requested a platter of local foods for us to sample. We arrived at Darkwood Beach Bar & Restaurant and were immediately welcomed by the staff.

antigua - cruising with members - marinalife
Darkwood Beach Bar

After selecting a table near the beach and ordering the national beer of Antigua, Wadidli (another name for the island itself), we had the privilege of hearing Elvis' story, learning more about his life and family, and even calling his wife to thank her for the yummy sandwiches. Then we feasted on fungee and pepperpot, a hearty meat stew with eggplant, pumpkin and squash, as well as local Caribbean lobster, curries and roti. All in all, an amazing way to end a spectacular day. We said goodbye to Elvis, exchanging addresses and knowing we had made a friend for life.

After exploring Antigua north to south and east to west, we opted for a catamaran tour to circumnavigate the island as our next adventure. The morning was spent pleasantly motoring in the calm blue waters of the Caribbean Sea around the north side of the island. Before we knew it, we were sailing along in the open Atlantic Ocean passing by Long Island, also known as Jumby Bay and a popular destination for celebrities.

After a wonderful morning on the water, we anchored in a protected cove for a stop to swim, snorkel and eat lunch near Green Island. It was a perfect destination for Amanda's first snorkeling excursion. After spotting a large sea turtle, magnificent coral reefs and exotic fish, we enjoyed a lazy swim near the beautiful powdery white sand of Green Island Beach.

Following a traditional lunch of jerk chicken, rice and plantains, we continued our journey around the island down to the southern tip to experience English Harbor and Devil's Bridge from the water. It was even more extraordinary from this vantage point.

As the sun started to dip low in the sky, we returned to the Caribbean Sea on the western side of the island watching a storm brewing in the distance. During the quiet sail back, each of us felt grateful for another magnificent day in paradise.

While traveling with your closest friends is always fun, my favorite memories of our time on this magical island were Anthony's reflections of his previous trips to Antigua with his grandparents, the excitement at sharing his favorite place with his new wife, and the joy that much of the island remained as he remembered it. We are already planning our next trip to Antigua!

STORY BY JEN LEROUX, CEO OF MARINALIFE; PHOTOS BY ANTHONY DESANTIS

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The Blessed Isles: More than Just a Stop Over
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SAILING ACROSS AN OCEAN IS OFTEN SEEN AS A MARINER's BIGGEST ACHIEVEMENT. With 4,000 miles between America and Europe, the distance across the Atlantic means a four-week transit across a temperamental ocean. For this reason, a small collection of mid-Atlantic islands earned the name, The Blessed Isles. Officially called Macaronesia, these four island groups the Azores, Madeira, Canaries and Cape Verde have played a central role in trans-Atlantic trade since boats first started long-distance voyages.[caption id="attachment_324683" align="alignleft" width="300"]

winship family - cruising - marinalife

Kia Koropp and John Daubeny with their children, Braca and Ayla in Los Lobos | John McCuen[/caption]Located west of Portugal, Spain and the north-African coast in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean, they continue to offer a mid-passage respite for modern-day mariners keen for a short break in route between the two continents.The four island groups are often considered relatively similar. All are volcanic in origin with several of the islands still active (as illustrated by the recent eruption of Cumbre Vieja in Las Palmas, Canaries in September 2021).Isolation from the mainland allowed species of animal and fauna to flourish, and their exposure to strong trade winds means a harsh environment during the northern winter.During my family's voyage here, we wanted to cut our trans-Atlantic passage by adding a mid-Atlantic stop, so we used the Canaries as a break point. Our plan: A week transit from Europe to the Canaries and then a three-week sail to the Caribbean.The Canaries is an autonomous region of Spain that consists of 13 islands. Given the geographic similarity to the Macaronesia islands, I was expecting an extension of Madeira and the Azores, but I couldn't have been more misinformed. Instead, we saw vast diversity within an island group. Each of the 13 islands has its own unique environment with a fascinating heritage that is evident today. To see one island is certainly not to have seen the others.

Tenerife Cave Dwellings

The original settlers of the Canaries were the Guanches who arrived from Africa in the 1st or 2nd century. They settled in caves across the islands, concentrated in Tenerife. What fascinated me about this history is that people still live in these cave dwellings today. Excursions throughout the countryside revealed numerous dwellings spread across the island with drying laundry splayed out on lines, dogs lounging outside cave entrances, chairs perched aside a rock wall and chickens living in their coops all scattered evidence of human habitation.We found isolated valleys where large communities were dispersed across a mountainside with small footpaths winding their way up the slope. I was intrigued by this current cave culture, still alive and vibrant. I've travelled to many countries where old cave dwellings are protected as UNESCO Heritage Sites, but this was the first time I'd seen established villages in remote caves. I drove aimlessly throughout the island, trying to find as many cave dwellings as I could discover a surprisingly easy feat given the number of them spread out throughout the Canaries.

Lanzarote Volcanic Vineyards

[caption id="attachment_324686" align="alignright" width="300"]

Cave settlements - cruising - marinalife

Cave settlements dot the hillsides across the Canaries. | Kia Koropp[/caption]Both the Azores and Canaries have developed a unique form of viticulture in a very inhospitable region. It's hard to imagine that someone can grow anything but the most rugged crop in the rocky, volcanic soil. Grape vines were the last thing I expected to crisscross the region. However, ingenious vintners have done just that they created an environment where grapes not only grow, but thrive.This form of deep-root horticulture called arenado is unique to Lanzarote. Small semi-circular walls called zoco are made from black lava stones that protect a single vine, providing a barrier against strong trade winds. It's a labor-intensive form of cultivation as each crater holds one vine, making hand-picked grapes the only option for harvesting. I did not anticipate a wine-tasting on our mid-Atlantic stop, but it was delicious and historically fascinating.

Lava Tubes & Subterranean Tunnels

Lava tubes and deep volcanic caverns riddle the Canary Islands. Several islands, such as Gran Canaria and Tenerife, have extensive pyroclastic fields and some display dramatic volcanic cones with impressive craters, such as Teide on Tenerife and Cumbre Vieja on La Palma.Given the range of erosional stages of the volcanic islands, each one offers a unique perspective. This means we could hike to the top of a volcanic rim that is covered in deep foliage (Gran Canaria), walk through volcanic moonscapes (Los Lobos), wander deep inside massive caverns (Lanzarote) and follow lava tubes deep inside (Tenerife).The different stages of each island display both the devastation and the beauty that volcanoes bring. As one explodes, another holds a breathtaking amphitheater and a species of blind crab that is indigenous to the island. While locals continue to deal with the aftermath of Cumbre Vieja's violent explosion on La Palma, Cueva de los Verdes, Lanzarote holds concerts for an audience of 500 in its expansive cavern and provides sanctuary to a species of blind albino cave crabs in its deep-turquoise underground freshwater lagoon.

Underwater Sculpture Garden

Equally unique to the Canaries is Europe's first underwater sculpture garden, a collection of 12 installations laid down by sculptor Jason deCaires Taylor to raise social and environmental awareness. Museo Atlántico was made public in 2017 and holds 300 life-sized human figures performing everyday tasks: a couple holding hands, a man sitting on a swing, fishermen in their boats, someone taking a selfie. Four years on and the sculptures are starting to create a decent false reef. The effect is impressive ... and rather eerie. My dive at the site remains an unforgettable experience that should not be missed on a trip through Lanzarote.[caption id="attachment_324684" align="alignleft" width="225"]

Museo Atlántico - cruising - marinalife

Examples of individual exhibits in the Museo Atlántico underwater sculpture park, Lanzarote | Kia Koropp[/caption]Many sailors use the largest of the Canary Islands, Las Palmas in Gran Canaria, solely for provisioning and boat preparation before a trans-Atlantic passage. However, if you bypass the islands that surround the main island you'd miss out on interesting and diverse islands that should be a highlight destination in the Eastern Atlantic. The ones we visited on our sail through the island group were a continuous series of unfolding surprises.The villages hold their own quaint small-town European character, and each island offers an experience drastically different than its neighbor. From the bustle of Gran Canaries largest city, Las Palmas, to the silent cave dwellers of its outer communities; from the enormous sand dunes of Fuertaventura's ParqueNatural de las Dunas to the barren volcanic cone of Los Lobos to the lush laurel forest of Los Tilos de Moya in Gran Canaria; from sea to inland lake to crater rim to underground tunnels; from camel back to mountaintop to mid-city cafes. The Canaries' special diversity makes a hop-through in route from America to Europe a must-see adventure.

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Transitioning to Life Afloat
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A double whammy. That's how I'd describe taking on the cruising life a second time around. As if moving from a sailboat to a powerboat, from two hulls to one, and swapping coasts wasn't change enough, we are also downshifting into retirement mode.[caption id="attachment_324200" align="alignleft" width="300"]

retirement - cruising life - live-aboard - marinalife

Retirement! On the road to Florida | April Winship[/caption]Even after a decade of cruising with our two young daughters, I am not prepared for the seesaw of emotions I'm about to face on our new endeavor. Unlike our previous sailing adventures, this time around won't be a family affair on the boat, and it's difficult to wave goodbye as our grown daughters disappear in my rearview mirror.Ahead of us lays 3,300 miles of highway unfolding like an undulating ribbon. Our destination is the Sunshine State where our new trawler and a new lifestyle awaits. I am acutely aware that we are venturing into uncharted territory, and the thought releases a flutter of butterflies deep in the pit of my stomach.Life's transitions, even happy ones, can be unsettling.I'm surprised that pulling back on the 9 to 5 throttle, slipping into flip-flops and unplugging from the rat race hasn't happened with a snap of the fingers. But my blinkers are on, and I'm definitely starting to merge into the slow lane.Beside getting to know the mechanical and electrical inner workings of our new trawler, I am also getting a refresher course in Live-Aboard Life 101. Unless your boat is the HMS Queen Mary, chances are that downsizing is going to become a reality. Shedding possessions is both liberating and painful, and even though I've streamlined to the max, every nook and cranny of our 34-foot boat is stuffed.Frustrated, I let loose a low growl as I dig out a dozen items from the settee locker before finally spying my buried prize. Thrusting my arm up victoriously, I look around for my husband Bruce, but he's splayed out on the bare fiberglass floor in the aft head (well technically he's splayed half in and half out over the painful raised threshold) replacing a worn-out head rubber seal.[caption id="attachment_324201" align="alignright" width="300"]

hauling out - transitions - cruising life - live-aboard - marinalife

Hauling out and sealing the deal | April Winship[/caption]Looking like a circus contortionist, he lays on his back and blindly reaches an arm around the toilet bowl in an awkward embrace to slip on a washer and then thread the nut... all by braille. My mind races back to our years cruising in Mexico when Bruce had to reach into the smelly holding tank to fish out a precious tiny pink Barbie-doll high heel that had somehow fallen into the toilet.At least you aren't going to have to retrieve a lost shoe from the holding tank on this voyage, I say with a chuckle. Only time will tell, is his murmured response, which is my cue to pick up a crescent wrench from the neat row of tools he's lined up, saddle up on his back and start tightening the bolt.I remind myself that everyday tasks take a bit longer to complete in a boat's compact environment, and any kind of maintenance on the to-do list is often intensified with the tropical heat and humidity. Tempers are ripe for flaring, and we try to remember that the sweaty work is best done away from the midday sun and served with a liberal dose of humor.While we opted for more comforts in our new powerboat than we had on our spartan sailing catamaran, these added luxuries translate to an additional layer of systems to learn, maintain and repair. Simply put, there is more stuff to break. But we relish a certain amount of self- sufficiency when cruising far from the dock, so mastering the systems we can use has become a vital mission.[caption id="attachment_324202" align="alignleft" width="182"]

boat - transitions - cruising life - live-aboard - marinalife

Courtesy of Andrea Fidone on Canva[/caption]During the past few months, we've been climbing a pretty steep learning curve. I've found that previous cruising experience doesn't always exempt us from our share of heart stopping moments such as trying to dock gracefully in a 15-knot crosswind or even the more mundane relearns such as Which way does the rabbit run on that bowline knot again?Life on a moving platform presents its own set of uncertainties: I wonder if I will get seasick on a monohull? Will I fit in with this new lifestyle? When will I stop jamming my toe into that stupid aft cleat? And the most asked question, when will I finally feel competent?From my previous cruising experiences, I know there are no shortcuts from novice to expert and becoming a well-oiled team takes patience, practice and time. Even when newbie isn't plastered across my forehead, I know there is always more to learn ... another skill to hone.As we learn to operate and maintain our new boat and settle into the cruising life, the second most asked question on everybody's mind is What's it like being together 24/7 on such a small space...don't you drive each other crazy? As with any situation, perspective is everything. I usually answer, My boat may be small ... but look at the size of my back yard.For us, cruising is also a shared dream and endeavor, and even with some the bumps along the way the lifestyle resonates with both of us. The rewards far outweigh the risks and challenges of a nomadic life.In my land life I flat out flunked the art of organization, but life afloat dictates a higher grade. It is all slowly coming back to me, the juggling act of meal preparation and execution with miniscule counter space and pared-down appliances. I've come to pride myself in optimizing every inch of our miniature Suzy Homemaker refrigerator and freezer.It's a balancing act, but as we settle into our cockpit chairs on the foredeck, plates firmly in our laps, the feat is worth it as we dine al fresco, witnesses to a last smooch by the sun as it kisses the horizon goodnight, and we bask in the afterglow of passionate colors.Set Sail and Live Your Dreams (Seaworthy Publications, 2019) is the Winship's book about their family's 10-year adventure cruising aboard their 33-foot catamaran Chewbacca. It is available in both paperback and e-book editions at Amazon.

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A Rendezvous to Remember
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Who knew that cruising to Hawks Cay on Duck Key in the middle of July could be so much fun? I did! As an avid boater with a passion for all things related to water and the Florida Keys, I eagerly accepted an invitation by Pursuit Boats to attend and represent Marinalife at their annual rendezvous. Having joined a few rendezvous in my boating career, I knew this event was one I did not want to miss.

rendezvous - marinalife
Courtesy of Natasha Lee-Putman

Early in the morning, we arrived at Bahia Mar Resort & Yachting Center in Fort Lauderdale, where the Pursuit team and 14 boats waited at the marina docks. We loaded up and headed toward Duck Key, which is roughly a six-hour trip by boat. Along our journey through clear turquoise waters, we were captivated by sightings of dolphins and other aquatic creatures swimming in the mangroves. Boaters coming in the opposite direction waved a cheery hello as if they knew we were going someplace special.

The first benefit of being part of this rendezvous is that everyone sticks together. We hit some rainy weather, but the lead boat made sure that everyone was comfortable and safe. Pursuit company boats were in the mix within the lineup to ensure that no one lagged behind or had any issues. This level of care never stopped. From arriving at Duck Key and informing everyone about the technique to enter the marina to having a crew ready to take your lines and help you dock, everything went like clockwork.

No one was too big to help. The President of Pursuit, VP of Sales for Malibu boats and other executives grabbed lines, helped people off boats and made sure everyone was docked safely and securely. To toast our successful trip, we were greeted with cold drinks before checking in.

rendezvous - marinalife
Natasha, Bruce Thompson President of Pursuit Boats, Megan Morris and Amy Gobel | Natasha Lee-Putman

Nearly 130 people from all along the Atlantic seaboard attended this rendezvous. We started the night with a welcome reception that offered everyone a chance to get acclimated and meet other boaters in attendance. The friendly, energetic group made introductions easy as we surveyed our schedule of events, which included snorkeling at the local sandbar in Marathon, racing in the very fun Poker Run around Sombrero Key Lighthouse and competing in a week-long daily fishing tournament. You could just relax in Hawks Cay's three pools or the fresh fed saltwater lagoon. Daily events at the pool ranged from sing-a-longs to kids' games.

Pursuit also offered one-on-one seminars from experts at such places as The Chapman School of Seamanship. They offered time with anyone who wanted to gain experience and training on topics such as docking boats, or guests could learn different ways to handle their boat. Pursuit arranged to have Yamaha engineers on hand to field questions or fix minor issues. Specialists from Fischer Panda Generator, as well as Seakeeper and JL Audio were available all week to make sure we had time to address all our needs. The staff was busy walking around and helping to remedy problems or answer questions. And you left knowing you had a person to call if other issues arose, and they'd be sure to remember you.

On the last night of the rendezvous, we came together for an awards dinner. Pursuit handed out prizes for everything from the biggest fish, the best poker hand, to the youngest fisherman. Everyone from the seasoned boaters to junior crew mates felt part of the rendezvous experience. Boaters made new friendships, and laughter filled the event hall. The grand finale slide show gave photographic proof that fun was had by all!

Hawks Cay - rendezvous - marinalife
Hawks Cay at sunset by the pool | Natasha Lee-Putman

In a time when many new boaters are hitting the water and people are using their boats to gather in smaller groups, rendezvous are a terrific option. Whether you've recently moved to a new waterfront community or have spent years cruising familiar waters on a Pursuit boat, everyone at these events encounters something enjoyable and finds opportunities to meet new people. These events also help keep people in boating longer, because they have a good time, develop stronger boating skills and discover new places to go.

If a similar rendezvous sounds right for you, ask your boat manufacturer, yacht club or local marina if they host similar events. It is an experience you can get hooked on! For more information about Pursuit or their next rendezvous, go to pursuitboats.com or learn about our memberships at marinalife.com/pursuit-concierge-club

Editor's Note: Pursuit offers a membership program to new 2022 Pursuit owners and everyone who attended this year's rendezvous. The Pursuit Advantage Club and Pursuit Concierge Club memberships are powered by Marinalife, which offers offer discounts on fuel, dockage, hotels and in some cases full concierge service and a one-year Gold Level membership to Sea Tow.

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Cruising the Caribbean's Garden of Eden
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Paying $1,000 to get into a country to experience both a volcanic eruption and a Category 1 hurricane might not be anyone's idea of the perfect holiday, but that's exactly what we got during our time in the Grenadines. Include a whale hunt and a broken foot, and the list of our experiences is complete. Regardless of the rap sheet, if you ask, How are the Grenadines? I'll say magical. Even the wrath of nature hasn't damaged the beauty that it holds.[caption id="attachment_324080" align="alignright" width="300"]

Petit Byahaut, St. Vincent - cruising with members - marinalife

Stern-tied in our favorite anchorage in Petit Byahaut, St. Vincent[/caption]Given the complexities of entry protocol during COVID, movement between Caribbean countries is now both a costly and lengthy process. Tiring of expensive PCR tests and long quarantine periods for a short amount of time in a small cruising area, we were in search of a cruiser's Garden of Eden where we'd have freedom of movement within a large group of islands. With 32 islands in the group, we'd found what we were looking for: the Grenadines was our Eden.We entered in early April, excited to spend a few months exploring this popular cruising destination. With a wide variety of islands, ranging from the pristine beaches of Tobago's white sand cays to the wildness of St. Vincent's black sand shores, the Grenadines offers plenty of diversity for those eager to explore. After two weeks in quarantine, we were eager.All thoughts of a leisurely cruise through a tropical paradise were unexpectedly stunted in our first week in the country. No sooner were we released from quarantine when La Soufrière, St. Vincent's northern-most volcano, erupted. We were in the neighboring island of Bequia when the sky slowly filled with an ominous plume of expanding ash.[caption id="attachment_324081" align="alignleft" width="300"]

Ayla and Braca - cruising with members - marinalife

Ayla and Braca watching the plume build from Bequia[/caption]By morning, every palm-fringed, white sand beach throughout the Grenadines was covered in a thick layer of toxic ash. The vibrant, aquamarine water was muted by a thin layer of grey film. Streets were empty and towns were deserted. Having just entered our Eden, our aquatic garden looked like the inside of an incinerator.We passed a succession of ghost islands along with a long line of other sailboats as we raced south to get clear of the toxic rainfall. After a few days of inhaling volcanic soot and scrubbing grit from my teeth, the winds changed direction and the thick grey haze finally cleared.Our Eden looked a bit dusty and rough around the edges, but the picture-perfect beauty of the Tobago Cays slowly reemerged. The seven small islands that make up the Cays surround an inner lagoon and are protected by a wide outer reef. Here we settled into true island life, swimming with the turtles and rays that populated the anchorage and gathering ashore with the other cruisers in the evening on uninhabited beaches.Over the next two months we slowly explored every palm-fringed islet and every sandy cay as we made our way back through the chain of islands. Each subsequent bay became our new favorite, and we soon settled into a leisurely routine of swim, rest, drink, sleep the epitome of the perfect Caribbean lifestyle. Eventually bliss and leisure weren't enough to keep us contented; it was time to shake the sand off our backsides and add some punch to our cocktail existence. I needed an adventure.[caption id="attachment_324082" align="alignright" width="300"]

eruption - cruising with members - marinalife

The aftermath of the eruption in Chateaubelair, a town in the red zone[/caption]We'd covered every island south of St. Vincent, but we hadn't yet explored the main island, the northernmost and largest of the group. A little research suggested that the volcano had stabilized and the red zone the area most affected by the volcano was no longer restricted. When looking for excitement, why not start at the heart of the disaster?St. Vincent is geographically different than the rest of the Grenadines, which are a collection of smaller islands with arid shrub-land, flat, wide-open bays and white sand beaches. The main island is lush, verdant, rugged and wild. First-century petroglyphs that were left by the Amerindians were carved, it is suggested, in response to environmental threats such as hurricanes and volcanoes that were never encountered. I thought it suitable that I seek these out in the wake of the recent eruption.The island is also known for its extensive rainforest and the rivers and waterfalls that run through it. While officially closed due to COVID, we were able to hike through the forest and stand under a few of these impressive falls. We stern-tied in tiny bays where sheer cliffs provided exhilarating rock jumps and swam through deep fissures in the rock.We sailed up to the far north of the island where most of the volcanic fallout was visible and took in the scarred earth: pyroclastic flows carved deep paths down the mountain, redirected riverbeds dumped muddy ash into the ocean, and acres of fallen trees lay blackened and scorched across the land.[caption id="attachment_324083" align="alignleft" width="263"]

Dark View Falls, St. Vincent - cruising with members - marinalife

Kia and Ayla enjoying the refreshing falls at Dark View Falls, St. Vincent[/caption]While our trip up the west coast of St. Vincent was filled with adventure, nothing was as unexpected as the whale hunt in Barrouallie Bay. While I understood it was practiced, I didn't expect that we would witness the hunt and kill of the blackfish, the local term for pilot whale. Five whales were dragged into the bay by small, motorized skiffs with a sawed-off gun mounted on the front.We were allowed to watch as teams butchered the animals, prepared the meat for drying and boiled down the fat into oil. While I am morally opposed to the practice, it was culturally fascinating to talk to the locals about their deep affinity for the meat, particularly the blubber which is revered as an elixir of life and a cure to all ailments, including, they assured us, for COVID.After languishing on the idyllic palm-fringed white sand beaches of the smaller islands, sailing up the west coast of St. Vincent was like dropping into the other side of the world. This was more than a Garden of Eden: It was a beautiful garden that backed up onto a magical forest, offering us the perfect combination of serene tranquility and high adventure. When choosing St. Vincent and the Grenadines, we couldn't have picked it better.Photos by Kia Koropp

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